Search
Press contacts



 
PARTNER 2 study reports zero HIV transmissions over eight years in gay men not using condoms: an undetectable viral load on HIV treatment renders an individual sexually non-infectious
The PARTNER study is an observational study focusing on the risk of sexual HIV transmission when an HIV positive person is on treatment. The second phase of the study  PARTNER 2, enrolled gay male couples in which one partner was HIV positive and the other was HIV negative. It only enrolled couples that had already chosen not to use condoms on a regular basis when they entered the study. To be eligible for PARTNER2, the HIV positive person needed to be on HIV treatment (ART) at the time of enrolment.
Read more about the PARTNER study here

The PARTNER study is the largets study to look at risk of HIV transmission when the positive partner in on effective treatment. The Study has been following almost 1,000 gay male serodifferent couples from 14 different countries in Europe, where one partner was HIV-infected and on suppressive ART, and the other partner was HIV-negative. The study followed couples from September 2010 to April 2018, over which time couples reported almost 77,000 episodes of condomless anal sex with no linked HIV transmission occurring. The results underline the importance of earlier diagnosis and treatment. 
Read the full press release on the final results here

The final results of the PARTNER 2 study was presented at the major AIDS 2018 Conference in Amsterdam 25th July at 11.45 am by Professor Alison Rodger. 
Find the full scientific presentation here
Webcast of presentation from AIDS 2018

In order to clarify design, objective, results and glossary of the PARTNER study the team has put together a Q & A document answering questions regarding the study.
Find the full Q and A document here 


Practical guidance to analyse possible cases of HIV-transmission under suppressive cART 
Based on all the available evidence, the risk of sexual transmission of HIV in the context of fully suppressive combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) is now widely recognised as being effectively zero. It remains important that HIV clinicians and researchers investigate any future case in which such a transmission is suspected in order to better understand any circumstances in which such a transmission might still occur, if any such circumstances exist. Researchers involved in the PARTNER Study have therefore put together this proposed guidance on how to investigate any potential future cases. This document proposes a protocol for optimal data collection in such cases. 












 
PARTNER Study Press Releases following International AIDS Conference 2018, Amsterdam
 
 
Denmark
Sweden
Norway
United  Kingdom
Spain
Switzerland
USA
Canada
Mexico
Brazil
International